Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Brands

Photos

The 10 Most Useful Backpacking Knots

Headed to the backcountry? Here are the knots every hiker should know how to tie.

Square Knot

This classic knot is useful in situations where you're connecting two pieces of rope. You can always add more pieces of rope, and this knot can be…

This classic knot is useful in situations where you’re connecting two pieces of rope. You can always add more pieces of rope, and this knot can be used almost anywhere, especially when you need to tie something loosely to your pack, or make extra line for a tarp or rain fly. Bonus: It’s easy to untie, even with a lot of stress added to it. 

STEP BY STEP: Holding the two ropes together at one end, take the left strand under the right and under, then right over left and under. Take the left part of the rope, put it over the right and wrap around. Take the new right side of the rope, put it over the left end and wrap it under. Watch the video

Backpacker’s Hitch

The backpacker’s hitch is for wrapping a rope around a tree, making it useful for securing your hammock, clothesline, or tent. It’s also popular for…

The backpacker’s hitch is for wrapping a rope around a tree, making it useful for securing your hammock, clothesline, or tent. It’s also popular for hanging bear bags. 

STEP BY STEP: Take the loose end of the rope and make at least three wraps around the tree and tuck the loose end under the last loop. The version shown is a slippery backpacker’s hitch, which can be easily untied by pulling on the loose end. Watch the video

Overhand on a Bight

This simple knot makes an adjustable loop anywhere on a rope. Easy to tie and untie, this fairly strong knot is often used to secure tent stakes.…

This simple knot makes an adjustable loop anywhere on a rope. Easy to tie and untie, this fairly strong knot is often used to secure tent stakes. 

STEP BY STEP: Take the end of the rope and make a loop, also known as a bight. Tie an overhand knot with the loop. Watch the video

Surgeon’s Knot

A Surgeon’s Knot is a square knot with two turns instead of one, making it especially useful for tying your boots. This knot is unlikely to slide…

A Surgeon’s Knot is a square knot with two turns instead of one, making it especially useful for tying your boots. This knot is unlikely to slide when tying two pieces of rope, or boot laces, together. 

STEP BY STEP: With one rope/lace, take the left end and wrap it twice around the right side Take the new right side and wrap it once around the left. Watch the video

Girth Hitch

This quick and easy knot, also known as a Lark’s Head knot or a Cow Hitch, is used to secure rope easily around trees or pre-existing loops on your…

This quick and easy knot, also known as a Lark’s Head knot or a Cow Hitch, is used to secure rope easily around trees or pre-existing loops on your pack.

STEP BY STEP: Take the middle of the rope, wrap it around the tree, then pull the ends through the loop you just made. Watch the video

Taut Line Hitch

A taut line hitch is used to secure a loop in a rope with adjustable length. This is especially useful for clotheslines, tent stakes, hanging a bear…

A taut line hitch is used to secure a loop in a rope with adjustable length. This is especially useful for clotheslines, tent stakes, hanging a bear bag, or tying down gear. 

STEP BY STEP: Wrap the loose end of the rope around the tree, then wrap that end around the rope twice inside of the loop you just made and once outside. Watch the video

Bowline Knot

A bowline knot is the ticket when you need a loop that won't move. Backpackers can use it to tie off a bear bag or secure a canoe to shore. It is…

A bowline knot is the ticket when you need a loop that won’t move. Backpackers can use it to tie off a bear bag or secure a canoe to shore. It is also classified as a rescue knot – you can tie it with one hand in cases where your other hand is immobilized. (Make sure to finish the knot with an overhand and a half-hitch if using it to hold a person.)

STEP BY STEP: Make a loop in the rope. Take the loose end of the rope, put it through the loop, wrap it around, and go back down through the loop. Watch the video

Sheet Bend

This knot is useful for connecting two pieces of rope of different sizes, in case you need a longer rope but are short on usable cordage.STEP BY…

This knot is useful for connecting two pieces of rope of different sizes, in case you need a longer rope but are short on usable cordage.

STEP BY STEP: With two ropes: Make a bight with with the bigger rope and take the smaller rope in the other hand. Put the smaller rope up through the bight, wrap it around the back of the big rope, and pull it through the loop you just made. Watch the video

Miller’s Knot

This knot is an easy way to tie off or secure the opening of a bag that you're going to be opening and closing a lot, as it is easily loosened and…

This knot is an easy way to tie off or secure the opening of a bag that you’re going to be opening and closing a lot, as it is easily loosened and tightened. 

STEP BY STEP: With one rope: Take one end of the rope, wrap it around the bag, and make an X in the front of the bag. Wrap the rope around again in the same direction, and tuck the end through the X. Watch the video

Trucker’s Hitch

The Trucker’s hitch is useful for securing gear to the top of your car. The loops can be modified and secured by a half-hitch for added stability.…

The Trucker’s hitch is useful for securing gear to the top of your car. The loops can be modified and secured by a half-hitch for added stability. 

STEP BY STEP: Tie a slip knot near your gear. Bring the end of the rope down to wrap it around your cargo hold. Bring it back up, pull the end through the loop of the slip knot, and pull the end down and tie a half hitch at the end of the rope. See the slideshow

Mastering knot tying will make your backpacking trips better and more hassle-free: no more tarps coming undone or futzing with a rat’s nest of overhands when it comes time to hang your bear bag. You don’t need to know a lot. Practice these 10 knots at home for a smoother trail experience.

Want to become a true knot master? Sign up for our Essential Outdoor Knots class at AIM Adventure U.