Stories

Wyoming's Red Desert

In September's "The Red Zone" writer Michael Behar and photographer Mike Sakas join biologist Erik Molvar through America's highest desert. See Sakas's photos of the trip here.


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Wild horses enjoy expansive terrain and near-total solitude in Adobe Town.

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The Red Desert’s estimated oil reserves would satisfy U.S. needs for six weeks.

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Endless quiet and solitude rule the Red Desert after the sun sets.

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Wyoming’s year-round fireworks sales make for a brilliant nighttime show.

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9,375-square-miles of canyons, hoodoos, mesas, and dunes cover the Red Desert.

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Cheetahs hunted for pronghorns in the Red Desert 13,000 years ago.

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Eons of water erosion have created precariously perched hoodoos.

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The ashen soil, infused with glassy silica, is highly reflective and amplifies the moonlight.

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The nearly waterless Red Desert requires hikers to cache water for their trips.

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The author inspects the remains of a long-dead bighorn sheep.

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At least 65 species of mammals, reptiles, and birds call the Red Desert home.