Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Brands

Conservation News

Just a little off the top: Denali gets shorter

In a recent scientific survey, North America’s tallest peak loses elevation — again.

Get full access to Outside Learn, our online education hub featuring in-depth fitness, nutrition, and adventure courses and more than 2,000 instructional videos when you sign up for Outside+ Sign up for Outside+ today.

Thanks a lot, science: For the second time in recent decades, a new survey from the U.S.G.S. recalculated the height of Denali (Mt. McKinley to cheechako blasphemers) and found North America’s tallest peak 83 feet shorter than previously thought. The new height of 20,237 might put a little spring in aspiring climbers’ step this year – but it also puts the peak closer to Canada’s 19,550-foot Mt. Logan, which is just embarrassing.

The new height discovery came from a $23.5 million state and federal effort to create digital elevation models for the entirety of Alaska. Expected to reach completion in 2016, the survey has an upside: According to Alaska’s lieutenant governor Mead Treadwell, they’re also discovering mountains and ridges heretofore unknown to man:

The Great One gets shorter, but we learn about mountains and routes we’ve never even heard of before. Seems like a fair tradeoff. Carry on, science.