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100-Mile Hike For Art's Sake

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A few weeks ago, artist Jim Denevanhiked over 100 miles in a dry Nevada lake bed to create the world’s largest free-hand drawing: It’s three miles across, and looms large across the desert even from 13,000 feet above. Denevan uses no formal measurement tools; using only his eyes and instinct for space, he draws by dragging rakes through the sand on foot (or by truck, for the larger landscapes) and then photographs them from above. The resultant piece looks like a modernist version of the Nazca Lines.

For all his hard work, Denevan’s artworks rarely last more than a few days. Denevan usually uses beaches as his canvas, waiting for the tide to erase any trace of his handiwork. For this largest piece in Nevada, a rainstorm eventually wiped the slate clean.

At least he still has the pictures.

— Ted Alvarez


Jim Denevan

Hiking Performance Art (Besthike.com)

The Largest Human-Made Art on Earth (Dark Roasted Blend)

Image Credit: JimDenevan.com