Gear Reviews

3 Great Backpacking Hammocks and Accessories

Get off the ground and out of the tent with these perfect backcountry picks.

Therm-a-Rest Slacker Snuggler

best camping hammock therm-a-rest
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Our tester slept cozily down to 35°F while camping near New York’s Wallface Mountain with this polyster-fill underquilt set up beneath his hammock. A 20-denier ripstop polyster shell resisted scrapes when it was accidentally dragged across the ground. The Snuggler garnered points for low weight and packability as well; it takes up about the same space as a rolled-up fleece when compressed. Bonus: “It was big enough for four of us to use as a blanket and huddle under while eating breakfast in chilly temps,” our tester reports.

$80; 15 oz.   

Therm-a-Rest Slacker Hammock House

Therm-A-Rest Slacker Hammock House
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Our take: For hammockers who enjoy the traditional “taco” sleeping shape, the Slacker is the best of the bunch. While lacking spreader bars found in competitors like the REI Quarter Dome Air, this hammock was still spacious enough to let our tester spread out and make himself comfortable over 10 nights in the Adirondacks. Long-hauler hikers beware, though: The Slacker is on the heavier end of the hammocks we tested.

Features: Hammock aficionados will find everything they need in this kit. It includes an attached bug net, rainfly, hanging straps, and stakes. Setup is simple, and one tester noted the pass-through hole on the bottom of the stuff sack as an added bonus, since it allows users to store it on the tree straps and avoid losing it at camp. Note: Heavy rain sneaks in underneath the fly, so pack a larger tarp if storms are in the forecast.

Trail cred: “The price tag for the Slacker is a major plus, as you won’t have to worry about buying tons of accessories,” our tester says.

$200; 4 lbs. 4 oz.

Therm-a-Rest Slacker Snuggler

best camping hammock therm-a-rest
Courtesy

Our tester slept cozily down to 35°F while camping near New York’s Wallface Mountain with this polyster-fill underquilt set up beneath his hammock. A 20-denier ripstop polyster shell resisted scrapes when it was accidentally dragged across the ground. The Snuggler garnered points for low weight and packability as well; it takes up about the same space as a rolled-up fleece when compressed. Bonus: “It was big enough for four of us to use as a blanket and huddle under while eating breakfast in chilly temps,” our tester reports.

$80; 15 oz.   

Sea to Summit suspension straps

Sea to Summit suspension straps
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At almost 10 feet long (9’10” to be exact), these tree straps make it easy to find a hang site for your bed without needing to find that “perfect” tree configuration. Proper buckle orientation is a cinch thanks to emoji-style graphics that indicate which sides face the tree. “I had no problem setting my hammock up in the dark, by myself, on the first try. That’s how easy these straps make it,” says our North Carolina tester. Ding: The buckles are only compatible with Sea to Summit hammocks, so they’re not as versatile as some competitors.

$25; 6 oz.