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3-Season Sleeping Bags Reviews

Mountain Hardwear Bishop Pass 30°F

The most best all-around sleeping bag of 2021

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Specs

Weight

1lbs. 13oz.

Our Take: At just shy of 2 pounds and only $200, the Bishop Pass is light on your back and your wallet. Its 650-fill, water-repellent down isn’t as lofty as higher fill powers, but it keeps the bag budget-friendly and compresses to the size of a bike helmet—perfect for packing alongside a week’s worth of gear in a 60-liter pack, as we did for a 62-mile trek in Wyoming’s Wind River Range. When temperatures hovered around freezing at the base of 13,804-foot Gannett Peak, we slept soundly. “The only downside is how shallow the hood is,” one tester says—when the hood wasn’t cinched, her makeshift clothing pillow slipped out; when it was cinched, there wasn’t enough room for the pillow and her head.

The Details: No risk of a close-quarters freak-out in this mummy—above-average 62-inch shoulder and 53-inch hip girths for men, and 60-inch shoulder and 50-inch hip girths for women, leave room for sleeping in any position. (It can create cold spots for more petite frames, though.) During an unexpected midnight drizzle in the Winds, the DWR-treated, 20-denier ripstop nylon fended off droplets falling through a faulty tent fly. “Moisture inside the tent didn’t soak in,” our tester says.

30°F; men’s and women’s; regular and long 

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