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Lake Superior Caribou

Travel to Lake Superior's Slate Islands for an up-close-and personal look at caribou in the wild. (Layne Kennedy)
  • Isolated for over 100 years without predators, the caribou on the Slate Islands show little fear.
  • Notoriously foul Lake Superior storms can whip up at a moment's notice.
  • Over 200 caribou roam the tiny Slates, making it the densest caribou population in the world.
  • Visitors to the Slates can expect ample opportunities to cast for abundant lake trout.
  • Once the site of extensive logging, the Slate Islands now exist as a Canadian provincial park.
  • Caribou can hide undetected like ghosts in the dense northern woods.
  • Late summer is an optimal time to visit the Slate Islands, but it could always snow.
  • The author enjoys a soak in a leftover tub from one of the many abandoned, dilapidated cabins.
  • Scientists don't know why but the Slate caribou eat leftover campfire ashes.
Isolated for over 100 years without predators, the caribou on the Slate Islands show little fear.
Image 1 of 9

Isolated for over 100 years without predators, the caribou on the Slate Islands show little fear.

READERS COMMENTS

Page 1

Great Photos!
— AC

Enjoyed the L. Surperior caribou photos. Concerning the caribou eating the ashes, I saw deer doing the same thing a couple of years ago during a hike on the AT. I'm not a wildlife biologist but my guess is that the ashes contain salts or minerals that are either tasty to the deer (or caribou)or are necessary but missing from their regular diet.
— Stuart Johnson


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