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Backpacker Magazine – September 2009

Higher Education: Should 13-Year-Old Jordan Romero Climb Everest?

Romero climbed Denali at 11 and has bagged five of the Seven Summits. He hopes to climb Everest in 2010, but is mountain climbing good for a growing kid?

by: Berne Broudy, Photos by Kevin Zacher

13-year-old Jordan Romero (center) with two friends.
13-year-old Jordan Romero (center) with two friends.
Jordan, 11, on top of Aconcagua.
Jordan, 11, on top of Aconcagua.
Ice axes and an Everest poster adorn Jordan's bedroom.
Ice axes and an Everest poster adorn Jordan's bedroom.
A dirt road becomes a luge course.
A dirt road becomes a luge course.
Jordan, 10, on Russia's Mt. Elbrus.
Jordan, 10, on Russia's Mt. Elbrus.
Jordan spies on his dad at home in Big Bear, CA.
Jordan spies on his dad at home in Big Bear, CA.

Tourists don't visit the children's court in Mendoza, Argentina. Why would they?

The three-story, cement-block building sits in the heart of a centuries-old colonial town that offers sightseers plenty of historic, whitewashed landmarks. But well-tended rose gardens surround the courthouse, and if on your tour through Mendoza you glimpsed them, you might ignore the building and snap a photo. If you had official business inside, however, you might ignore the flowers and see only the building. It looks just like a courthouse should: intimidating.

Rewind to December 14, 2007, when Jordan Romero entered the court, along with his dad, Paul, and Karen Lundgren, Paul's longtime partner. They are not tourists. They are climbers. And they hope to summit 22,841-foot Aconcagua. But unlike other mountaineers–who arrive in Mendoza, pay the $300 permit fee, and head to basecamp–Jordan has an extra challenge to overcome. Park regulations prohibit climbers younger than 14 years old. Jordan is 11.

Paul carries a manila file crammed with permissions and endorsements from Jordan's mother, his pediatrician, even character references from teammates and family friends. The folder contains health records, passport forms, and reams of paper documenting Paul and Karen's expertise (they're both world-class adventure racers, and Paul works as a helicopter medic). They've also hired a young local lawyer, Arturo Erice Argumedo, to help Jordan secure a special dispensation to climb South America's highest peak.

Inside the courthouse, Karen presents their documents and a clerk hustles them off to an examination room, where a doctor takes Jordan's pulse, peers into his ears, taps his knees, and examines his tongue. Next stop: the Honorable Elsa Lidia Galera's chambers. Inside, a large oak desk sits beneath a slowly rotating ceiling fan. Galera waits to hear Jordan's case–from Jordan. Through a translator, the slight 4'11" boy details his previous climbs up the likes of Kilimanjaro and Elbrus. He explains his dream to climb the highest peak on every continent, and he politely asks for permission to attempt Aconcagua.

The judge remains silent for a moment–then she walks around her desk and gives Jordan an affectionate, motherly squeeze and ruffles his disheveled, sandy curls. She squats so she can look directly into his brown eyes. Then she grasps his arms in her hands and makes him promise that he will cherish their new friendship, take care of Paul and Karen on the climb, and send a signed photo when he reaches the summit.



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ALL READERS COMMENTS

Steve
Feb 20, 2014

He sure is somthing different

alex
Feb 20, 2014

Great job you really took my breath away!!!!!! <3

Alexandria
Feb 20, 2014

i think he did and awesome and i think alot of things could go wrong but i just think i loved the way he set his mind to something really encouraged others to do what they set their minds to.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Annika
Feb 20, 2014

i know that you guys may not like what Jordans parents let him do but he set his mind oto what he whanted and he went for it and i know it was the wrong thing to do by letting a 13 year old bot do this but it was kind of herofic and he really encourage me to do set my mind to something and never let it go!!!!!! <3

Kharmon
Feb 20, 2014

Eric
Feb 20, 2014

That boy is amazing I wish he was my son.
He would have his friend with him all the time.

Eric
Feb 20, 2014

How are they going to let a 13 year old climb mount everest.some thing wrong with their parents!!!!!!!

Eric
Feb 20, 2014

How are they going to let a 13 year old climb mount everest.some thing wrong with their parents!!!!!!!

Eric
Feb 20, 2014

How are they going to let a 13 year old climb mount everest.some thing wrong with their parents!!!!!!!

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Gary
Feb 26, 2013

Sure he can do it ! So long as he is essentially Guided and fed along with an M.D. on the "Expedition". And... the weather and Mountain conditions are faultless ! Obviously he can't have the years of High Mountain experience one should have to even think about for even some of the "Lower" Himalayan peaks. A 13 yr. old doesn't have the psychological or physical maturity to be on an 8K Meter Peak to do anything SAFELY ! As far as the comment about "Dick Bass", also think about Beck Weathers, M.D. !
.

Ben
Jan 14, 2012

I'm curious as to how Jordan has been able to miss so much school.

EDward
Oct 18, 2011

hey ye guys

Adam Still
Sep 28, 2010

I read a comment by his father which noted he doesn't pay attention to the critics. It is obviously another way to not face the irresponsible choice he made towards his son. The planet is filled with an unspeakable amount of adventures that 7 lifetimes will not fill. Was taking his son on a definite roulette wheel outcome override those? Canyons, caves, the wild fields of Northern regions, Antarctica, the sea floor, ballooning Africa, kayaking miles of coast, sand dunes of the Gobi,etc, whatever.

Was such a strong risk that necessary so fast? I regret my offering the thought, but his son is what dreams are made of, but Paul's are what nightmares are brought forth from. He deserved to lose his son, and live through the greed of his decision.

For Jordan, thank the air we breath for his safe return. Mounatineer, adventure racer and high altitude medical specialist?? Can you tuck your son under your arm and fly from the death dealing situation like Superman? Your accomplishments don't mean anything compared to your job to be an outcome balancing parent.

You are lucky you made it and can gloat. You would have gone down in history as the worst parent on the globe if the scenario turned out like it has for so many more worthy and skilled than you.

Bizarre
Sep 28, 2010

Taking a chance on his son losing his life to uncontrollable conditions is what was shameful. The kid is rock solid, but even the best will not endure the worst the mountain may offer. It's like taking your child up in a plane that may become unable to control and crash, or may not. This based on a plane of that nature, which Everest is. It's not all skill that brings you home up there. A grand majority is luck.

I think it was awesome, but it was a specifically SELFISH parental risk. He could have done Everest as he grew and had a chance to see a bit more in this world. I guess the idea that "my son would be the first" was just a little to good to pass up. Hey what the F, roll the dice, I either lose him or I'm, oops, we're famous....

Bizarre
Sep 28, 2010

Taking a chance on his son losing his life to uncontrollable conditions is what was shameful. The kid is rock solid, but even the best will not endure the worst the mountain may offer. It's like taking your child up in a plane that may become unable to control and crash, or may not. This based on a plane of that nature, which Everest is. It's not all skill that brings you home up there. A grand majority is luck.

I think it was awesome, but it was a specifically SELFISH parental risk. He could have done Everest as he grew and had a chance to see a bit more in this world. I guess the idea that "my son would be the first" was just a little to good to pass up. Hey what the F, roll the dice, I either lose him or I'm, oops, we're famous....

Bizarre
Sep 28, 2010

Taking a chance on his son losing his life to uncontrollable conditions is what was shameful. The kid is rock solid, but even the best will not endure the worst the mountain may offer. It's like taking your child up in a plane that may become unable to control and crash, or may not. This based on a plane of that nature, which Everest is. It's not all skill that brings you home up there. A grand majority is luck.

I think it was awesome, but it was a specifically SELFISH parental risk. He could have done Everest as he grew and had a chance to see a bit more in this world. I guess the idea that "my son would be the first" was just a little to good to pass up. Hey what the F, roll the dice, I either lose him or I'm, oops, we're famous....

Gwen
Jun 19, 2010

I was lucky enough to read an advanced review copy of Jordan Romero's book, THE BOY WHO CONQUERED EVEREST, which comes out this month.
It's a surprisingly sweet story for younger kids. No boasting or bragging; just a nice story with lots of photos from Jordan's climbing journeys. And yes, it IS inspiring!

Sierra
May 27, 2010

also..how many 13 years olds have the will and attention and WANT to go through classes and training..he has guts

Sierra
May 27, 2010

let him do what he wants and loves..shit.i mean if i was his parents id b thrilled..i mean how many thirteen year olds do YOU know who can do that..slim to none..

Jenn
May 25, 2010

this one is for the idiot talking about acclimatising being cheating...

Obviously you have never climbed a mountain in your life or you would know it's standard practice for all climbers novice and experienced to use the "climb high sleep low" method. You can't just go to everest and say ok lets climb this mother! You have to give your body time to adjust to the low pressure of oxygen in the air or you can develope acute mountain sickness which can then develope into high altitude pulmonary edema or high altitude cerebral edema if not treated with caution. So before you start to pick on a 13 year old who has more guts then you could ever dream of why don't you do a little research and learn how every other climber in the world would accend Mt. Everest!

Jeff
May 23, 2010

I used to walk up a very steep grade on a very small hill out side of Poway, CA called Mount Woodson. As you close in on the top of this little mountain you feel every step. Although it is not that big, it is steep! One day a very old man who was well up into his 80's came flying past me. For a split second I thought he was running up the grade. I couldn't believe it. He should have been in a nursing home, or using a cane or sitting in a rocking chair! Got to the top and chatted with him for a bit. He was from Switzerland and had been walking around in the Alps all of his life. He was visiting family in San Diego. Anyway, he did something was wasn't supposed to do at his age.

Congratulations Jordan on doing something you weren't supposed to do at your age. Breaking the boundaries of conventional wisdom is what distinguishes greatness. Who knows, perhaps one day you might also become the oldest person to climb Mt. Everest. That would be quite a feat to hold the record for both youngest and oldest!

Bob P
May 23, 2010

I've got mixed feelings. I'm all for Jordan-from what I read he's at the right maturity level and doing it for the right reasons, and he has well qualified parents to help him. He's not JUST record chasing. My youngest son started rock climbing at 8 and lead climbing at 10, and he was mature enough to handle it.
But what next? There are plenty of pushy parents and record chasers out there. Should I have taken my 1 year old grand-daughter with me when I went to Everest base camp last month? She'd have been the youngest to ever do that!
But when all the chatter is complete, one thing remains. Jordan summitted! Congratulations, Jordan! Keep pulling down!

Brian Johnson
May 22, 2010

Robbins: Are there no new worlds to conquer?
Prat: The bar opens at 4 o'clock (but ya gotta be 21).
(With apologies to Sheridan Anderson)

Jim in Big Bear
May 22, 2010

He made it today. It was so nice to see his dream come true! What an inspiration!

Zigfried
May 20, 2010

Go for it kid!! I taught myself to free-climb as a child. Overseas in the military, I really got serious in freeclimbing. Later, during and after college, I learned to use roping techniques.

My point is - society puts blocks on us in behavioral expectations. Alexander the Great set out to conquer the "known" world when he was 19 years old, and he succeeded.

Keep up the good work; live the excitement!For those of you out there who have never experienced it, climbing is the second most exhilarating feeling in the world.

Charles Bell
May 17, 2010

Do you people think that Jordan doesn't understand the danger? (To the extent that anyone who hasn't actually experienced Everest can, that is.) Do you think he does not realize that he could die there? Do you think he hasn't read Into Thin Air? Or do you just think that a 13-year-old, however physically and emotionally mature, should not be permitted to take such risks for whatever reason?

You certainly have a right to that opinion.
Jordan has an equal right to his.
The difference is, he can act on his right. You can only write about yours.

Good.

Jason
May 16, 2010

Hmm, tough call. Nothing in life is ever certain, except that life is fragile. Is sleeping in a tent to prepare for altitude cheating, or good prevention medicine to protect a 12-year-old? In some older civilizations, he would be an adult at 14.

Compare to the average 12-year old. Thinking about dating, experimenting with drugs and alcohol (if not now, within 4 years by the national average). Sedentary - playing on computers and video games. Studying only when he needs to.

Compare to the average Olympic Competitor - started their sport in their tweens or younger, daily training through their late teens, to enter into a competition against others who have done the same. One person wins, everyone else loses.

He's getting to know the wilderness. Keeping fit. Can't afford to do drugs and continue to do what he's doing. Keeping his mind sharp with constant study of something he enjoys. Dangerous - yes. Life Changing - Certainly. Big Moral booster. Could lead to a positive career. Just like any other young athlete.

Yes - I would be concerned that it's really his desire to do this, just like I would be with anyone who's obsessed with an activity (pressure from peers and parents affects everything - from fashion to games to sports and drugs and anything else). I don't see any reason to not let him try - and hopefully his doctor will publish the medical impacts of his activity to make the discussion easier to prove for the next 13-year old.

allard
Apr 22, 2010

Being "wise beyond his years" and being a nice kid will be no help in the Death Zone. There are no sure things on Everest. It's impossible to prepare for every eventuality. If he wants an adventure there are plenty of other things to do. If he wants notoriety, that shows a lot about his adolescent character and his parents' wanting to live vicariously through their kid. I hope he and his dad come away from this uninjured. In fact, I hope they climb to about 6000, take some pictures, and come back home so that the kid can become a kid. When he's twenty-five maybe he can come back and climb it becauseit's there.

Raymond
Apr 12, 2010

Good luck in our calass room we are talking about you i beleve you can do it you rock if your daont think you can make it tourn back because every step counts I'm on your side you roke be carefull i love you

Steve
Apr 12, 2010

I started taking my son on some easy alpine routes at age 8 after he'd been climbing in the gym since he was 3 and he loves it. He has other interests that I don't enjoy so much but I support him with those as well. I think it's spectacular that Jordan has the support to attempt and probably reach world records. Think back to Dick Bass. He had a goal and went for it against nearly impossible odds and landed the record of first to climb the seven summits. Good luck on all your dreams and goals, not just to set a record but for life as well. You have a great opportunity to inspire others for good.

T.M.
Apr 12, 2010

What is wrong with all of you? There are so many unknown variables in life you can not control. How about your child walking home from school when a driver loses control? How about a kidnapping? A stray bullet fired from an officers gun from a nearby bank robbery? There are inherent risks you do with everything. Before we start chasitzing the parents, how about posting some statistics about other activities children engage in and analyize the possible outcomes of those. Sure, Everest is a very challenging feat to accomplish. With a documented history of brutality against climbers, the ever-so-changing, almost demonic atmosphere at those elevations, it is safe to say a summit of Everest is not to be taken lightly. From this point of view, until I hear further, it looks like a young man with more knowledge and wisdom then lots of kids his age. And until I hear further or meet his parents, there is no reason for me to believe that they are "forcing" him into this decision, rather guiding him on this quest for his own spiritual health. I mean, Mt. Everest at 13, what a freakin confidence booster for life! With his parents already experienced mountaineers, his father and his extensive medical training, and Jordan being able to use these parental resources fro his personal gain, he is in more than good hands for this quest. If the unknown happens, god willing it doesn't and probably wont, we as humans can not help dealing with the unknown. And I do not want to hear about any "unknown" can be prevented if they did not take him. Would you stop going to your favorite restaurant if you got robbed at the gas station on the way there? If you would,I am sorry for that, but I will continue to live my life without an incident like that stopping me. Be glad this kid is not out there robbing houses, doing drugs, and stealing. I do hope that he takes the time to be a kid after this. This trip with have an extraordinay impact on his personal drive. Am I related any way to this family? No, never met them once yet, just offering my personal opinion with an open mind not giving a d*** what anyone else thinks. Good luck on Everest kiddo. Funny, who would have though I would be "looking up" to a kid who is 8 years younger than me, and probably a foot shorter as well. See ya non the mainland little dude.

T.M.
Apr 12, 2010

What is wrong with all of you? There are so many unknown variables in life you can not control. How about your child walking home from school when a driver loses control? How about a kidnapping? A stray bullet fired from an officers gun from a nearby bank robbery? There are inherent risks you do with everything. Before we start chasitzing the parents, how about posting some statistics about other activities children engage in and analyize the possible outcomes of those. Sure, Everest is a very challenging feat to accomplish. With a documented history of brutality against climbers, the ever-so-changing, almost demonic atmosphere at those elevations, it is safe to say a summit of Everest is not to be taken lightly. From this point of view, until I hear further, it looks like a young man with more knowledge and wisdom then lots of kids his age. And until I hear further or meet his parents, there is no reason for me to believe that they are "forcing" him into this decision, rather guiding him on this quest for his own spiritual health. I mean, Mt. Everest at 13, what a freakin confidence booster for life! With his parents already experienced mountaineers, his father and his extensive medical training, and Jordan being able to use these parental resources fro his personal gain, he is in more than good hands for this quest. If the unknown happens, god willing it doesn't and probably wont, we as humans can not help dealing with the unknown. And I do not want to hear about any "unknown" can be prevented if they did not take him. Would you stop going to your favorite restaurant if you got robbed at the gas station on the way there? If you would,I am sorry for that, but I will continue to live my life without an incident like that stopping me. Be glad this kid is not out there robbing houses, doing drugs, and stealing. I do hope that he takes the time to be a kid after this. This trip with have an extraordinay impact on his personal drive. Am I related any way to this family? No, never met them once yet, just offering my personal opinion with an open mind not giving a d*** what anyone else thinks. Good luck on Everest kiddo. Funny, who would have though I would be "looking up" to a kid who is 8 years younger than me, and probably a foot shorter as well. See ya non the mainland little dude.

Nic
Apr 11, 2010

This is shameful. Paul Romero should lose his son.

Tag
Apr 11, 2010

I don't doubt the kid's motivation, but what's the point of climbing when you take shortcuts? Sleeping in a tent to acclimatize before getting to the mountain seems like cheating and is a slight to the mountain and to every the climber who's expended a real effort to reach the summits. We don't allow professional athletes keep their records if they use performance enhancers. This is the same thing; he's not using a drug, but would he be able to perform the same if he wasn't cheating by acclimatizing in a tent?

Peter
Apr 11, 2010

You can read a lot of naive nonsense here. The Everest - a "mountain experience"... a child can benefit from climbing up there... My god! The Everest is a monster. Everybody climbing up the Everest has a high chance to die, even if he is the best climber in the world. One minor error and you are gone... Even if you don't make errors you can die.

Look at the photos: he is a small boy - a child. Thinking about letting a this boy climbing up there is just sick.

Anonymous
Apr 09, 2010

his parents are probably pushing him..he probably wont make it anyway!

RG
Apr 08, 2010

GO FOR IT ROMERO!!!
I BELEVE IN U

RG
Apr 08, 2010

GO FOR IT ROMERO
I BELEAVE IN U

Mek
Apr 08, 2010

It does seem strange that a kid would want to climb all these mountains but he's doing it for all the right reasons. I'm tired of hearing about adults doing it for the publicity and money and everything. Mountains are there so lets climb them. If he's already done the other 6, what says he isn't capible of doing Everest? Good luck Jordan!

John
Apr 08, 2010

There are certain facts about life. One of those facts is that kids of that age do not possess the maturity for such a test. He'll be a burden on his team. Maybe he'll have a babysitter with him. Wait a few years kid and do it with the responsibility and maturity to do it right.

been there
Mar 26, 2010

Qomolangma will be there in 2015 aswell. why hurry?

asshole2.0
Mar 17, 2010

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james davis i belive
Mar 17, 2010

that u shall beat everest and win the hearts of millions now you

josh namz
Mar 17, 2010

ur a bitch come 2 abbot to talk 2 me

Mary
Mar 15, 2010

Not the best supporting example: the 7-year old flying across the country crashed & died. The question all writers on this topic seem to skirt is: what is this about? Is this really about a "kid following his big dream," or parents pushing to commodify a kid's talent? If he loves climbing mountains, he can do that. It shouldn't have to be a cocktail party checklist of mountains. But publicity and sponsorship and $$ seem to be the driving force in steering kids to do this stuff.

Andrés
Feb 06, 2010

The big issue is that climbing above 6000 m. is seriously playing with your life. While Everest is the best serviced mountain this doesn´t make it less serious. Only seconds decided the end of the life of professional high altitude sherpas like Babu Chiri. Heli´s can´t fly in this altitude. Take care if you go for it!!!

The Cave Man
Jan 02, 2010

To George Burley:

I think Jordan does know about the dangers involved in climbing Everest. People around him surely have brought up the death statics you have cited and I am sure some one has given Jordan Krakauer's book "Into Thin Air" about the 1996 Everest Disaster. Jordan must be going into this with a clear head and a sound soul.

Mr. Burley, where I have a issue with you is where you think that the risk is too great for your kids to climb Everest.

I must ask you - why did you have kids? Did you have kids so they can be a slave to your desires and make you happy or did you have kids so they can experience life as they see fit and make them selves happy? Who's life is it- yours of your childs?

Also, there is no such thing as a "Risk Free life". Every moment we are alive there is a element of risk from something at all times. What one does is to try to calculate what the risk is and then try to minimize those risk as much as possible. That is all anybody can do. We do that every single day of are lives- I.E. we wash our hands before eating- I know a simple example but very important to our health.

Just as long as Jordan is fully aware of what the effort will entail and doing it the safest way possible - by all means Jordan should be able to do so. It is his life and no one else's.

Again, I ask why have kids? Let them live their life as they see fit - not as you see fit.

Mrs. Eller
Nov 16, 2009

Interesting comments, but before you think it is wrong for this boy to climb maybe you should meet him. I had Jordan in my class for a year, and continue to know him. He is NOT the average 13 year old. He is wise beyond his years and has always found the ordinary a bore. If you truly think he is driven by the adults in his life, you are wrong. Knowing this family, I can tell you anytime Jordan wants to do something different he can and with the joyful support of his parents. No one pushes Jordan except Jordan. Just watch this boy, Everest is not the most amazing feat this boy will accomplish.

Andy
Oct 23, 2009

Go For it Jordan!!! He is not a 1 in 10 kind of young man! He's 1 in a million! He will succeed!

Jessica (one of Jordans friends)
Oct 19, 2009

I think that he should do it its his goal and hes so close to acheiveing it so i say GO FOR IT JORDAN

Nicole
Oct 07, 2009

I work with inner-city teens. Danger is an ever present part of life, whether we admit it or not. Why aren't we more concerned about the career couch potato with a spare mil to spend to summit? Jordan has the experience. I believe it's hypocritical and degrading to try to stop Jordan from reaching the summit.

George Burley
Oct 06, 2009

You guys realize that the death rate Everest is roughly 1 death for every 10 people that summit. Of the people that do summit they have a 1 in 20 chance of not making it down alive.

Now I ask you, is your son or daughters life worth a 1 in 20 chance of dying for the sake of climbing a mountain? I know mine isn't.

Everest is no place for a kid, no matter how talented he is.

marietta
Oct 02, 2009

He's not a novice even at 13. I think he realizes more than others give him credit for of the dangers and calamities associated with a climb of this magnitude.

Eric Nelson
Sep 28, 2009

How could mountain climbing not be good for a kid? His lifestyle is certainly not traditional, but I know hundreds of teens (I teach at a high school) who would benefit greatly from a mountain experience. They would improve their self - esteem, vision for the future, work ethic; should I go on? Maybe he won't know how to solve a quadratic equation when he's 16, but who the hell needs that? I teach math. I know I never used it before I was a teacher, and I was a geophysics consultant. Go for it Jordan!

ryan
Sep 25, 2009

I belive that if he whats to climb and the goverment put him on the permit, let him climb

AussieSteve
Sep 24, 2009

I'm sorry.... a 13 year old shouldn't be put into a life threatening environment like Everest. I have 11 year boy who I take climbing, and he has done what most boys only dream of ... but there's a limit.
I applaud Jordan's parents for giving him a life that has a "you can do it" attitude attached to it, but Everest ??? I don't know ....

Patrick Lilly
Sep 24, 2009

It's a sad sign of the institutionalized timidity of our age--and the paternalism of governments in general--that a motivated individual should have to waste his or her time and justify his or her wishes to get a "special dispensation" to engage in a totally peaceful and healthful endeavor!

Lynn Hartman
Sep 24, 2009

My 15 year old worked and made most of his own money to go with the Spanish class to Ecuador this past summer. Now, he is working (and we are helping out a little bit but he does most of it) to go to Costa Rica with the class; then, Peru and then onto Spain. Work, grades, almost an Eagle Scout. Let's hear it for some of the youth.

Lynn Hartman
Sep 24, 2009

Years ago I heard that a 7-year-old girl flew an airplane by herself across the US because she had her pilot's license. My hat is off to you Jordan. Be careful and good luck.

Richard
Sep 24, 2009

Yes, we all wish our children to have broad experiences which help mold them into becoming "a super-amazing young" adults, but this reads like it is just unchecked self indulgence on both child and parents part.

Aside from the fact a child at that age is not capable of understanding this and the real dangers involved in it, the "fundraising" aspect bothers me. If the parents paid for this with their own money, it would be different. But asking others to contribute to a large sum of money so one's child can become "a super-amazing young man" is troublesome.

KBWood1008
Sep 24, 2009

Having worked with youth this age since I was little older than them, I am pretty sure I see what is motivating his young man. And I find it very very sad. My hope is that the attention the young is finally getting from his parents and their significant others does not cost him his life on a remote mountain.

As for, should he climb Everest? I don't think so. As another poster put it, is he ready to make decisions that could him his life... but I would add that his decisions could cost other their lives as deaths seldom occur individually on Everest.

Mr T
Sep 24, 2009

Go for it Jordan. Pursue your passion. Don't let the small minded and the timid get you down. You will find that compromising to the the ignorance of others keeps you "average". Be extraordinary.

Nick
Sep 24, 2009

Randy said it all. Maybe if he was 17/18. Not 13.

Randy
Sep 24, 2009

I would ask the question, Would you be ok if he died climbing Everest? For an Adult you can accept their death while climbing because they old enough to fully consider the consequences. I have a seriously hard time with a 13yr old make such a life threatening decision. I don't care how careful you think you will be, many deaths on Everest have nothing to do with preparedness but everything to do with wrong place/wrong time.

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