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Backpacker Magazine – BACKPACKER.com Online Exclusive

Make Your Own Walking Stick

Ease the load on your knees and shoulders by making a hiking stick.

by: Jonathan Dorn


Sure, carrying a hiking stick makes me look like a rugged mountain man, but it also helps me in more pedestrian ways. By easing the load on my knees and shoulders, it helps me chew up big miles, plus I can tiptoe across loose rocks, slippery logs, and rushing streams without a wobble. Here's how to create your own personalized staff like the ones shown below and at left:
  1. Search your local forest for a downed branch that's stout, straight, and preferably, blemish-free (no obvious cracks or big knotholes). The stick should reach your armpit and measure 1 to 2 inches in diameter.
  2. Remove twigs with a pocketknife and strip the bark if you want. Round off sharp points or level knobs with a plane or file. Hold the stick as though you're hiking (your elbow should form a right angle) to figure out where your grip will be-- 2 to 3 inches below the top. Customize the grip by cutting shallow grooves for your fingers like those on a steering wheel. Just above the grip area, drill a 1/4-inch hole for a wrist loop. Smooth the surface of the stick first with coarse, then fine, sandpaper.To remove residual sawdust, wipe the stick with a rag dipped in paint thinner.
  3. Decorate the stick with carvings, wood burnings, paintings, emblems or bear bells. If the wood is still green, place it in a warm, dry location to cure for at least 2 weeks, and rotate it often to prevent bowing.
  4. Apply two coats of wood stain, allowing each coat to dry overnight, to give the stick a darker, richer hue. Then apply three coats of clear urethane varnish to seal the wood and prevent rot. Allow each coat of varnish to dry overnight. Sand the stick lightly with very fine sandpaper or steel wool after each coat.
  5. Thread a 2-foot piece of rawhide lace or heavy cord through the hole. Adjust the length of the loop to fit your wrist, tie the ends in a big knot to secure the loop, then trim the ends as necessary.

    Wood is a fickle creature, so remember that hiking sticks are born as much as they are made. --Jonathan Dorn

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READERS COMMENTS

Star Star Star Star Star
Patton
Jan 24, 2014

One last thing is to add an aluminum conduit coupling to the "working" end of the stick. This will prevent the end of the stick from wearing too quickly or spitting. Also, aluminum is relatively soft and sticky on rocks and will not slip as easily as a bare stick, or harder metal.

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