Big Agnes Foidel Canyon 2

This sturdy, double-wall two-person dome tent offers the protection and space campers need for year-round use—and the durability to do it year after year.
Foidel Canyon 2 Tent
Price $650.00

Specs

Ease of Setup 4.9 / 5
Weatherproofing 4.9 / 5
Ventilation 4.9 / 5
Living Space 4.5 / 5
Durability 5 / 5
Fast-Pitch Setup
Materials Floor & Fly: Nylon Ripstop with Dyneema (1200 mm waterproof polyurethane coating); DAC Pole system with press fit connectors and light weight bulbs
Free Standing
Capacity 2
Number of Poles 0

 

Diameter of Poles (mm) 9
Floor Space (sq ft) 34
Layout other
Length (inches) 92
Width (inches) 52
Interior Height (inches) 43
Vestibule Type standard
Vestibule Front Area (sq ft) 10
Vestibule Back Area (sq ft) 10.5
Weight 4 lbs, 6 oz

Stormproofing

When a snowstorm and 30-mph gusts hammered Colorado’s Indian Peaks Wilderness, we slept soundly, thanks to a super-taut pitch and steep walls that shed snow and wind. Two crossing poles deliver time-tested stability, and the fly extends closer to the ground than most three-season models. “It’s stout enough for anything in the Lower 48,” one mountaineer says. Only the doors use mesh panels (they can be covered with nylon) so we stayed warm on subfreezing fall nights above treeline in the Rockies.

Livability

Even our taller testers (6’2” and 6’6”) enjoyed spacious quarters, thanks to the 43-inch peak height and 92-inch interior length. Two doors and two 10-square-foot vestibules shelter packs and climbing gear, though to ease exits, some of us preferred to store packs inside (the 34-square-foot floor is big enough for people and gear). And ventilation is excellent: Even on subfreezing nights, no condensation accumulated.

Setup

It’s a cinch to pitch, even in the dark. Credit color-coded buckles, reflectors on the fly and canopy that highlight buckle points, and simple geometry (two preconnected crossing poles plus a brow segment).

Durability

Thirty-denier Dyneema fabric on the floor and fly make this tent tougher than most. Fifteen times stronger than steel, Dyneema withstands heat, cold, and UV rays better than nylon, so it maintains its strength over time. Downside? Dyneema’s higher cost.