SUBSCRIBE | NEWSLETTERS | MAPS | VIDEOS | BLOGS | MARKETPLACE | CONTESTS
TRY BACKPACKER FREE!
SUBSCRIBE NOW and get
2 Free Issues and 3 Free Gifts!
Full Name:
Address 1:
Address 2:
City:
State:
Zip Code:
Email: (required)
If I like it and decide to continue, I'll pay just $12.00, and receive a full one-year subscription (9 issues in all), a 73% savings off the newsstand price! If for any reason I decide not to continue, I'll write "cancel" on the invoice and owe nothing.
Your subscription includes 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Or click here to pay now and get 2 extra issues
Offer valid in US only.

Also on Backpacker.com


Enter Zip Code

Backpacker Magazine – December 2000

Hiking California's John Muir Trail

This magnificent trail travels through three California parks while showcasing the natural wonders Muir worked to preserve.

by: Taryn Jory and Andy Dappen


John Muir, the staunch 19th-century conservationist, might well be considered the father of our National Park system. It is due largely to his lobbying, writings, and influence that California's Yosemite, Sequoia, and Kings Canyon National Parks exist today.

So it's appropriate that the 211-mile John Muir Trail (JMT) travels through all three parks. Along the way, and with 11 additional miles to traverse from the top of Mt. Whitney to Whitney Portals, the trail showcases the features so magical to Muir: sheer rock walls, mile-deep canyons, skyscraper-tall trees, saw-blade ridges, golden granite, green lakes, cobalt skies, and pine-scented forests. With such natural endowments, it's not surprising that the JMT, spanning 160 air miles of wilderness uncrossed by roads, was one of our readers' top picks for scenery.

Unfortunately, the solitude that Muir so valued in the Sierra is now somewhat diluted; don't harbor illusions that the JMT will lead you far from human contact. The trail is well used, and regulating agencies have put a great deal of effort into providing ample signage, quality trail work, and well-maintained campsites.

Muir might roll over in his grave if he knew his Sierra has become so civilized, but readers appreciate the results of all this work. Without it, a well-loved trail might be loved to death.

For best information:
Pacific Crest Trail Association, (916) 349-2109; www.pcta.org/jmt/index.html. Guide to the John Muir Trail, by Thomas Winnett and Kathy Morey (Wilderness Press, 800-443-7227; www.wildernesspress.com; $11.95).




Subscribe to Backpacker magazine
Sign up for our free weekly e-newsletter
Name:
Address 1:
Address 2:
City:
State:
Zip:
Email (req):

Reader Rating: -

ADD A COMMENT

Your rating:
Your Name:

Comment:

My Profile Join Now

Most recent threads

The Political Arena
Buddhist Extremist Cell
Posted On: Aug 19, 2014
Submitted By: craigwill
Trailhead Register
Tips for long road trips?
Posted On: Aug 19, 2014
Submitted By: Cloudwalker
Go
View all Gear
Find a retailer

Special sections - Expert handbooks for key trails, techniques and gear

Check out Montana in Warren Miller's Ticket to Ride
Warren Miller athletes charge hard and reflect on Big Sky country, their love for this space and the immense energy allotted to the people who reside in Montana.

Boost Your Apps
Add powerful tools and exclusive maps to your BACKPACKER apps through our partnership with Trimble Outdoors.

Carry the Best Maps
With BACKPACKER PRO Maps, get life-list destinations and local trips on adventure-ready waterproof myTopo paper.

FREE Rocky Mountain Trip Planner
Sign up for a free Rocky Mountain National Park trip planning kit from our sister site MyRockyMountainPark.com.

Follow BackpackerMag on Twitter Follow Backpacker on Facebook
Get 2 FREE Trial Issues and 3 FREE GIFTS
Survival Skills 101 • Eat Better
The Best Trails in America
YES! Please send me my FREE trial issues of Backpacker
and my 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Full Name:
City:
Address 1:
Zip Code:
State:
Address 2:
Email (required):
Free trial offer valid for US subscribers only. Canadian subscriptions | International subscriptions