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Backpacker Magazine – Backpacker.com Online Exclusive

Dayhiking Gear Checklist

Ready your gear quiver for a for a full day outing.

by: The Backpacker Editors

    Tags:

ON YOUR BODY

 

IN YOUR PACK
COLD WEATHER ADDITIONS

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ALL READERS COMMENTS

Rick
Jul 07, 2014

These lists are very helpful and very difficult to find from the menus. I first found them on an external search, then have tried a few times to navigate to them. Please improve the navigation. I often refer people to them. Thanks!

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deltazen
Sep 22, 2013

Compass AND GPS, not compass OR GPS. It's not optional, bring the compass! GPS can crap out from no signal or dead batteries. Bring the map AND compass - and know how to use them!!
In your micro ditty bag with the compass goes at least one foil rescue blanket or bag, the fire starting kit, the Petzl e-Lite micro headlamp, AND the signal mirror. Every hike, every day - along with the trowel and TP, this micro ditty is always in the pack!!

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AZ Hiker
Feb 15, 2013

An essential in every hiker's pack should be a compass! A compass doesn't need a signal or batteries and works in all types of weather but you need to know how to use it and this book "Felix the Sugar Glider Be Safe Hike Smart." makes learning how to use a compass easy. Felix! explains how to orient yourself using a compass, a compass and a map, a map and no compass, no compass and no map. Look for it on Amazon, "Felix the Sugar Glider Be Safe Hike Smart". Anyone wanting to know direction and especially for those who want teach these skills to children might enjoy learning from this book. To feel more confident about orienting ourselves outdoors, we read thru this book before every hike - it's only about 34 pages and illustrated. The ability to know your way and know where you are is something we all need in any survival situation not just while hiking. Learn to stay found by using a compass and paying attention to your surroundings. Felix! teaches the reader what to pack, trail ethics, what to do if you get lost or scared, how to get rescued, and survival packing (for the car and for the trail) just incase you end up unexpectedly spending the night outdoors.

AZ Hiker
Feb 15, 2013

This video might help answer KY boy scout's question: http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=167087

AZ Hiker
Feb 15, 2013

This video might help answer KY boy scout's question: http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=167087

KY boy scout
Apr 27, 2012

Could somebody please tell me how to get the most sparks out of a firestarting kit (just a flint rod and a knife)?

KY boy scout
Apr 27, 2012

Could somebody please tell me how to get the most sparks out of a firestarting kit (just a flint rod and a knife)?

Stephen
Apr 16, 2012

You really should add a knife to the list. A knife is an essential tool for survival.

Tracy
Mar 20, 2012

Only you know how you'll react in an emergency. Your brain is your best weapon, and these are just ideas to help you survive buy adding some helpful tools. Some need more help- others need less. Not sure?? pack for the worst case scenario and lighten up as you learn. just a thought....

David Diaz
Mar 15, 2012

Here's a great online interactive checklist and pack-weight calculator app:

http://www.weighmygear.com

Mark
Jan 12, 2012

I will also say that no matter what fabric you choose, a shirt that fully buttons is going to be cooler in summer than a pullover shirt, even a T-shirt. Also, a longsleeve, lightweight, light color button shirt is better than a shortsleeve shirt, as the long sleeves protect you from the sun and actually keep you cooler, and you can roll em up if you want.

Mark
Jan 12, 2012

I agree that "never wear cotton" is too rigid a commandment. Never wear cotton socks, that's for sure, because they are a perfect recipe for blisters, but in the heat of the summer down South here a cotton shirt is just fine. Even the lightest wool and synthetic shirts aren't going to be as comfortable, and there is no risk of hypothermia in the flatland south in the summer.

sam
Oct 31, 2011

Anyone have any fvaorites for boots. I live in Kentucky and hike the knobs. Short hikes 4 to 13 miles. Keep in mind snakes.

Anonymous
Jul 25, 2011

Steve
Mar 19, 2011

I like to use a lightweight fishing vest as my daypack. It has lots of pockets and room for my camel. As it warms up latter in the year I switch to my day pack as the vest gets to warm. The vest is great for winter hikes as it fits nicely under my heavier coat.

Jim Cheney
Mar 06, 2011

I carry an Altoids container in my shirt pocket with water proof matches, 4 very small doggie waste bags (to collect & carry water, Iodine tablets, 2 bandaids, 4 small saftey pins, and a whole container of dental floss (removed from the dispenser). This is in addition to the clothes, trail fooe and junk in my camelback. Just think... Fire, and water

rrcaniglia
Nov 14, 2010

Ditto to Jerry's comment:

"...add category "IN YOUR POCKET: Spare light source, spare fire-starter, pocketknife, bandanna."

I learned in the military that you cannot assume your pack will stay with you during an emergency. There is a subset of survival aids that must remain on your body--at least when you're on the move.

Rick


Posted: Aug 31, 2010 ~jerry

larrsland
Oct 01, 2010

I carry a $10.00 tarp tent. This item is small, light, and great if you need a quick shelter or ground cloth to sit on.

Grunt
Sep 03, 2010

Everyone is diff. No two ppl carry the same exact things BUT since batteries fail, I always carry old school compass and glow sticks. Rain poncho and at least 10' of cord. I always have trekking pants and tshirt in my daypack no matter how long/short of a trip Im going to be on. Being able to change into dry clothes can brighten any situation.

Rootie
Sep 02, 2010

Cotton in the summer, synthetics in the cooler climate and fall. To the one guy: it's the two hour hike alone people you see on I shouldn't be alive.

the buckaroo
Sep 01, 2010

Cotton wet is the most miserable feeling in the backcountry...stretches, will not return to form, hangs like three sizes too big...just what you need to kill the mountain buzz. Get a clue...wicking wear, period! Cotton is for the three "B's"...briefs, blue jeans & bandanas...keep on trucking...'nuff said.

John I. Gutierrez
Aug 31, 2010

All of these comments exemplify that our list of needs is subject to the conditions, our objectives, and our personal preferences. In my opinion, if there is nothing else you remember when packing for any excursion, short or long, cold or hot, remember the Ten Essentials and adapt accordingly. Navigation, Sun Protection, Insulation, Illumination, First-aid, Fire, Repair, Nutrition, Hydration, and Shelter.

John I. Gutierrez
Aug 31, 2010

All of these comments exemplify that our list of needs is subject to the conditions, our objectives, and our personal preferences. In my opinion, if there is nothing else you remember when packing for any excursion, short or long, cold or hot, remember the Ten Essentials and adapt accordingly. Navigation, Sun Protection, Insulation, Illumination, First-aid, Fire, Repair, Nutrition, Hydration, and Shelter.

John I. Gutierrez
Aug 31, 2010

All of these comments exemplify that our list of needs is subject to the conditions, our objectives, and our personal preferences. In my opinion, if there is nothing else you remember when packing for any excursion, short or long, cold or hot, remember the Ten Essentials and adapt accordingly. Navigation, Sun Protection, Insulation, Illumination, First-aid, Fire, Repair, Nutrition, Hydration, and Shelter.

~jerry
Aug 31, 2010

my 2 cents worth (only 40 years of trail experience)
add category "IN YOUR POCKET:
Spare light source, spare fire-starter, pocketknife, bandanna."
add to category IN YOUR PACK:
Multi-tool w/ knife, 25' of cord, space blanket or tarp, signal mirror AND whistle.

Steve Cash
Aug 31, 2010

I always carry a pocket knife and will toss in a short length of cord (8' or so). Also, many times I opt for a trusted wool Pendleton shirt. They are light weight, take less space than some fleece jackets, comfortable in a wide range of temps, and give me that warm fuzzy feeling.

Don
Aug 31, 2010

These comments are funny; one person has a perfectly rational reason for wearing cotton in the summer and another uses bold print to say 'never wear cotton' as if it's a commandment from (whichever god you choose).
It's a gear recommendation checklist no one is going to be checking and obviously use common sense and use what works for you.
Personally, I like to get a flask of sipping whiskey into my pack, even better if it's locally made, but that's not mandatory either. ;)

Wayne
Aug 31, 2010

Bandana, waterproof matches or disposable lighter, whistle. Signal mirror? Stick in an old CD if you must.

big-T
Aug 31, 2010

Not compass or GPS - compass AND GPS

Schwill
Aug 31, 2010

Why no mention of wool shirt or underwear on your body? Wool is much more comfortable, cooler, and doesn't stink as bad as synthetic IMO.

Eric Nelson
Aug 31, 2010

Wow! All good ideas, but I'd say some are a bit too much. Your first item to pack is common sense which implies "Plan Ahead and Prepare". I went for a hike in the frontcountry Saturday. I was only going two hours (an out and back hike)All I really needed was water. I knew there was a 0% chance of rain and the trail was easy and I would encounter several bikers and hikers. All I took was water, an extra shirt (to change into when the other was all sweaty), extra socks, my driver's license and a first aid kit. My point here is that what I bring all depends on where I am, the season and how long I will be out. When I did an all-day hike in the Colorado mountains last winter I brought nearly all the things listed plus an ice axe and crampons.

Dennis
Aug 26, 2010

I used to always use synthetics, even in summer. But, sometimes you want the cooling properties of cotton. Bring an extra t-shirt and take the advantage of how much cooler a wet cotton t-shirt will make you feel.

Deanna
Jun 20, 2010

I have many allergies including wool and all petro based synthetics. I wear 2 layers of silk longies for warmth and wicking.I never feel sticky in silk,it is light weight, cheaper than many wool or synthetics and feels great on the skin.

adam
Jun 07, 2010

I carry all of the above mentioned and more. My pack weighs 20lbs and that is for just a day hike. I always feel a little self conscious marching out from the trail head with a all this gear. But I have to say that I use every bit of it. I often pass fellow hikers a couple of hours into the trail at 6000 ft or more with nothing, just a bottle of water. Still at least I am prepared for anything and could help someone if they where stuck on the trail.

Angela
Jun 01, 2010

Mole skin is always a great item to carry along on hikes.

RJM
May 05, 2010

Along with the excellent suggestions my list adds treking poles, camera, binocs, flower book, pencil, 50' p-cord, trash bags, bug repellant, bear spray. No wonder my pack is so heavy.

TODD
Mar 30, 2010

YOU SHOULD ALWAYS HAVE A "SIGNAL MIRROR" IN ANY TYPE OF KIT. VERY SMALL, CAN SIGNAL FOR MILES AND COULD SAVE YOUR LIFE!!

Terrie
Feb 20, 2010

What are you supposed to do if you're allergic to wool *and* synthetics??

Bob
Sep 25, 2009

ALWAYS brind an old school compass in addition to GPS. ALWAYS!!!

Mike Kanner
Sep 04, 2009

Since I hike in the Rockies, where bad weather can come in quickly I add a space blanket and a poncho. They can provide warmth and shelter in a pinch.

Dave
Jul 10, 2009

I'm gonna pass on the sythetic bra, I prefer cotton.

Dave
Jul 09, 2009

I'm gonna pass on the sythetic bra, I prefer cotton.

Roxann Lizzie
Jun 22, 2009

Don't forget the whistle.

Julian
May 18, 2009

For those wondering about synthetics:
the advantage of "wicking" comes as much after a workout or hike as much as during it. Sweat is moved away from the skin, which keeps you cooler during your workout. The wicking process helps facilitate the part of the sweating process that actually keeps you cool: evaporation. And, after your workout, as the sweat is in the air and not on your skin, it isn't there to rob your body of its heat.
So, NEVER WEAR COTTON, it does neither of the things that synthetics do and, especially, it won't dry when you get it wet.
Wool is a popular substitute for some synthetics (backcountry.com makes many marino wool pieces) and I would advise that, though it may be an ugly process, find out which synthetic you are allergic to, there are many kinds!

Inquire about Conditions
May 03, 2009

Local conditions vary widely and even daily. Inquire about local conditions and always read any trail warnings. (EX: Flooding in Canyons can occurr w/o warnings). Tides ? Always have a current map and check with authorities on seasonal closures and on trail conditions. I always bring a flashlight and extra batteries.

Mike
Mar 18, 2009

I'd take a GPS AND a compass. This may be old school, but a GPS doesn't yet seem like a substitute for a compass to me. . . .

Jacques Doucette
Dec 07, 2008

I would also add to the list a good multi tool or knife and,I find rope can always come in handy

Gary
Oct 29, 2008

I'm new to the synthetic T shirts.... my first experience was that they were hot and they itched. I'm not sure what the advantage of "wicking" is when you sweat more than normal.

Drew
Sep 13, 2008

An extra pair of pants is always a good thing to carry.

Ed
Jun 12, 2008

If you have a GPS, carry at least 1 set of extra batteries. If you are low on power, turn it off until needed, use battery saver mode if you have it.

Kristoph
May 27, 2008

Silk is also a good option, especially for underwear.

Nathan
Apr 01, 2008

I'd try wool if allergic to synthetics.

Greg Haske
Mar 30, 2008

Great list...only one problem...what is your advise for people allergic to synthetics?

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