SUBSCRIBE | NEWSLETTERS | MAPS | VIDEOS | BLOGS | MARKETPLACE | CONTESTS
TRY BACKPACKER FREE!
SUBSCRIBE NOW and get
2 Free Issues and 3 Free Gifts!
Full Name:
Address 1:
Address 2:
City:
State:
Zip Code:
Email: (required)
If I like it and decide to continue, I'll pay just $12.00, and receive a full one-year subscription (9 issues in all), a 73% savings off the newsstand price! If for any reason I decide not to continue, I'll write "cancel" on the invoice and owe nothing.
Your subscription includes 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Or click here to pay now and get 2 extra issues
Offer valid in US only.
Share your tales of travel & adventure with our step-by-step guide. Upload trail descriptions, photos, video, and more. Get Started
The DAILY DIRT - The nitty and the gritty of outdoor news

Wolves in Massachusetts, Wolverines in California

So far, March has been a big month for formerly extirpated large predators in the U.S.:

First, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service scientists confirmed that an animal killed on a western Massachusetts farm after mauling several sheep was in fact a gray wolf. Farmers hunted  Massachusetts wolves out of existence over 160 years ago, and the nearest current populations are in Ontario and Quebec. Officials don't believe the wolf was ever held in captivity, which gives lupine enthusiasts hope that one day more big, bad wolves might wander their way back into New England's forests. (If past experience proves true, Bay Staters can probably expect future fisticuffs between nature lovers and farmers).

Then, the following day, a remote research camera unmistakably captured a wolverine prowling in the Tahoe National Forest north of Truckee, Calif. The last wolverine was shot in 1922, and though biologists have long searched for the large predator and oft-used high school mascot, they've always returned up empty-handed. But Oregon State grad student Kate Moriarty caught the wolverine on a remote camera she'd set up to study martens, the wolverine's much more diminutive cousin. Good job, Katie: It's the first known photo of a wolverine in the Sierra Nevada ever.

The reappearance of both animals was so well-timed, I have to wonder if both species might have planned it this way over an elk carcass dinner in Alberta or something.

Wolverine: "OK, Wolfie, I'll take Cali and you take Massachusetts."
Wolf: "Alright, Wolvie. This is gonna freakin' blow their minds."

— Ted Alvarez

First wolf found in Mass. in 160 years (Boston Globe)

Elusive wolverine makes its first Sierra appearance in years (Sacramento Bee)

READERS COMMENTS

jude
Oct 23, 2010

cool

ADD A COMMENT

Your rating:
Your Name:

Comment:

My Profile Join Now

Most recent threads

Gear
Tell me about new boot trends!
Posted On: Sep 01, 2014
Submitted By: hikerjer
Rocky Mountains
Backpacking Trip in the Beartooths
Posted On: Sep 01, 2014
Submitted By: hikerjer
Go
View all Gear
Find a retailer

Special sections - Expert handbooks for key trails, techniques and gear

Check out Montana in Warren Miller's Ticket to Ride
Warren Miller athletes charge hard and reflect on Big Sky country, their love for this space and the immense energy allotted to the people who reside in Montana.

Boost Your Apps
Add powerful tools and exclusive maps to your BACKPACKER apps through our partnership with Trimble Outdoors.

Carry the Best Maps
With BACKPACKER PRO Maps, get life-list destinations and local trips on adventure-ready waterproof myTopo paper.

FREE Rocky Mountain Trip Planner
Sign up for a free Rocky Mountain National Park trip planning kit from our sister site MyRockyMountainPark.com.

Follow BackpackerMag on Twitter Follow Backpacker on Facebook
Get 2 FREE Trial Issues and 3 FREE GIFTS
Survival Skills 101 • Eat Better
The Best Trails in America
YES! Please send me my FREE trial issues of Backpacker
and my 3 FREE downloadable booklets.
Full Name:
City:
Address 1:
Zip Code:
State:
Address 2:
Email (required):
Free trial offer valid for US subscribers only. Canadian subscriptions | International subscriptions